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Updated on September 13, 2023
3 min read

Can You Mix Fluconazole and Alcohol? Is It Safe?

What to Know About Mixing Alcohol and Fluconazole

Sometimes, medications have adverse, even dangerous, side effects when mixed with other substances. This is why it’s important to know how the medications you are taking will react with other substances you might consume. 

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What is Fluconazole (Diflucan)?

Fluconazole is an FDA-approved medication that belongs to a class of drugs called azole antifungals.

Doctors prescribe fluconazole to treat various fungal infections of the: 

  • Vagina
  • Mouth
  • Esophagus
  • Lungs
  • Urinary tract
  • Abdomen
  • Other organs

Doctors may also prescribe fluconazole to prevent fungal infections in people undergoing chemotherapy or radiation before bone marrow transplants.

Fluconazole is available as a tablet or suspension to be taken orally. You may see fluconazole marketed under the name Diflucan. 

How Does Fluconazole Work?

Fluconazole stops the enzyme responsible for the growth of the fungal cell membrane. 

While it is typically effective in fighting yeasts, such as Candida and Cryptococcus, it is not effective in treating all strains of fungal infections. These infections may require alternate antifungal therapy.

Can You Mix Fluconazole and Alcohol?

Technically, yes. There are no known interactions between fluconazole and alcohol. However, when taking medication, be mindful of drinking alcohol in moderation, you should be mindful of drinking alcohol in moderation when taking medication.

Although fluconazole may not interact with alcohol, it can negatively interact with certain drugs. Speak to your doctor before taking fluconazole if you’re on antibiotics, blood thinners, sedatives, diuretics, or antiseizure drugs.

Risks of Mixing Fluconazole With Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can change the microorganisms in your intestine. People with chronic alcohol use show a large increase in intestinal Candida. 

Alcohol is linked to several illnesses and diseases, such as liver damage. It can also weaken the body’s immune defenses. 

While alcohol may not interact directly with fluconazole, it can cause your body to heal slower or exacerbate drug side effects, such as headache, upset stomach, and drowsiness.

Does Alcohol Make Fluconazole Less Effective?

Alcohol does not make fluconazole less effective. However, you should not drink alcohol if you feel sick or uncomfortable while fighting a fungal infection. Alcohol can worsen the infection.  

Other Side Effects of Fluconazole

Fluconazole is generally well tolerated, but adverse effects have been reported.  

Some of the common side effects of fluconazole include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Abdominal pain or discomfort
  • Upset stomach
  • Stomach pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Heartburn
  • Loss of appetite
  • Skin rash
  • Skin inflammation
  • Skin itching
  • Unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth

Seek medical attention immediately if you have difficulty breathing or swelling of the mouth or throat. This may indicate a severe allergic reaction.

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Updated on September 13, 2023
7 sources cited
Updated on September 13, 2023
All Alcoholrehabhelp content is medically reviewed or fact checked to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable media sites, academic research institutions and, whenever possible, medically peer reviewed studies.
  1. National Institutes of Health.“Fungi in the gut linked to alcoholic liver disease.” www.nih.gov. June 20, 2017.
  2. RxList “Fluconazole (Diflucan): Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings.” www.RxList.com. 14 Apr. 2017. 
  3. MedlinePlus. “Fluconazole: MedlinePlus Drug Information.” U.S. National Library of Medicine. Dec 2018.
  4. Govindarajan, Ameish. “Fluconazole.” U.S. National Library of Medicine. 21 Apr. 2020. 
  5. RxList. “Side Effects of Diflucan (Fluconazole), Warnings, Uses.” www.RxList.com. 26 Oct. 2020.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Vaginal Candidiasis.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Preventionwww.cdc.gov. 17 Dec. 2019. 
  7. ClinCalc DrugStats Database. “Fluconazole.” Fluconazole - Drug Usage Statistics.” www.clincalc.com. 2018.
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All content created by Alcohol Rehab Help is sourced from current scientific research and fact-checked by an addiction counseling expert. However, the information provided by Alcohol Rehab Help is not a substitute for professional treatment advice.
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